Director

Kenneth W.
Kinzler
Genomics
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

• BS, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science
• PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
• Postdoctoral Fellow in Oncology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

• BS, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science
• PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
• Postdoctoral Fellow in Oncology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine


Achievements
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Bert Vogelstein, Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins

Director

Bert
Vogelstein
Genomics
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

• BA, University of Pennsylvania
• MD, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
• Pediatric Residency, The Johns Hopkins Hospital

• BA, University of Pennsylvania
• MD, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
• Pediatric Residency, The Johns Hopkins Hospital


Achievements
Read More

News: 

Johns Hopkins scientists use pap test fluid to detect ovarian, endometrial cancers

Using cervical fluid obtained during routine Pap tests, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test to detect ovarian and endometrial cancers. In a pilot study, the “PapGene” test, which relies on genomic sequencing of cancer-specific mutations, accurately detected all 24 (100 percent) endometrial cancers and nine of 22 (41 percent) ovarian cancers. Results of the experiments are published in the Jan. 9 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Host: 

The Ludwig Center located at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Johns Hopkins Center

Director

Kenneth W.
Kinzler
Genomics
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

• BS, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science
• PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
• Postdoctoral Fellow in Oncology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

• BS, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science
• PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
• Postdoctoral Fellow in Oncology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine


Achievements
Read More
Bert Vogelstein, Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins

Director

Bert
Vogelstein
Genomics
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

• BA, University of Pennsylvania
• MD, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
• Pediatric Residency, The Johns Hopkins Hospital

• BA, University of Pennsylvania
• MD, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
• Pediatric Residency, The Johns Hopkins Hospital


Achievements
Read More

News: 

Johns Hopkins scientists use pap test fluid to detect ovarian, endometrial cancers

Using cervical fluid obtained during routine Pap tests, scientists at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have developed a test to detect ovarian and endometrial cancers. In a pilot study, the “PapGene” test, which relies on genomic sequencing of cancer-specific mutations, accurately detected all 24 (100 percent) endometrial cancers and nine of 22 (41 percent) ovarian cancers. Results of the experiments are published in the Jan. 9 issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Host: 

The Ludwig Center located at the Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, USA.

Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins
1650 Orleans Street, Cancer Research Building, Room 590
Baltimore, MD, us, 21287
T 410 955 8878
F 410 955 0548

Our Center is focused on identifying the genetic alterations responsible for human tumorigenesis and exploiting this knowledge to manage patients with cancer.

Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins
1650 Orleans Street, Cancer Research Building, Room 590
Baltimore, MD, us, 21287
T 410 955 8878
F 410 955 0548

Directors

Kenneth Kinzler and Bert Vogelstein
Our work is focused on identifying the genetic alterations responsible for human tumorigenesis and exploiting this knowledge to manage patients with cancer. Our group has discovered that human cancers result from the sequential accumulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, with each mutation conferring an additional selective growth advantage to the cell. A typical human cancer requires four to eight of these mutations to become fully malignant, and it usually requires decades for these mutations to accumulate. In addition to their implications for designing new therapeutics, the mutations provide uniquely powerful tools for diagnosis. We are particularly interested in the use of genetic alterations to detect tumors at an early stage, when they are still curable by surgery.

Kenneth W. Kinzler

• BS, Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and Science
• PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine
• Postdoctoral Fellow in Oncology, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Bert Vogelstein

• BA, University of Pennsylvania
• MD, The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine
• Pediatric Residency, The Johns Hopkins Hospital

TEAM

Luis A.
Diaz, Jr.
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

I am a medical oncologist and an expert in the treatment of colorectal and pancreatic cancers. My research focuses on the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of cancer genomics.

Education
BS, University of Michigan, 1993

MD, University of Michigan, 1998

Residency, Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, 2001

Fellowship, Medical Oncology, Johns Hopkins Medical Institute, 2004

Gregory J.
Riggins
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

The Brain Cancer Biology and Therapy Laboratory’s goals are to develop and improve new therapies for brain and other cancers. We have developed more accurate in vivo and in vitro models of brain cancer for these preclinical studies. We also carefully study the molecular, pathological and genetic basis of gliomas, medulloblastoma and other nervous system malignancies to better understand how to improve the therapies we are developing in the laboratory. The first clinical trial from our work has opened for the treatment of newly diagnosed high-grade gliomas using a repurposed drug that disrupts tubulin formation and oncogenic signaling. We are also developing new therapies for clinical trials based on drug combination, activation of apoptosis, or using immune mediate targeting of solid tumors.

Education
MD, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, 1994

PhD, human genetics, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, 1994

MS, biomedical engineering, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, 1984

BChE, chemical engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware, 1982

Awards
Professor of Neurosurgery and Oncology (with Tenure) at Johns Hopkins University, 2008

Director, Division of Neurosurgery Research, Johns Hopkins University, 2006

Inaugural Recipient of the Irving J. Sherman Professorship in Neurosurgery Research, 2004

Tenure Awarded (clinical and basic science), Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, 2002

Laboratory Director, Brain Cancer Biology and Therapy Laboratory, 1997

Christine
Joseph
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Associate

Bjarne
Bartlett
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Technologist

Cherie
Blair
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Program Coordinator

Will
Hendricks
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow

Yuchen
Jiao
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow

Isaac
Kinde
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

MD, PhD student

Qiang
Liu
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Technologist

Janine
Ptak
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Technician III

Nick
Roberts
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow

Joy
Schaefer
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Technologist

Andrew
Skora
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow

Surojit
Sur
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Associate

Qing
Wang
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

PhD student

Fay
Wong
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow/Bioinformaticist

Ming
Zhang
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow

Nickolas
Papadopoulos
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Cancer is a genetic disease, and from all the differences between cancer and normal cells it is the genetic alterations present in the cancer cells that unequivocally distinguish them from the normal cells. Such genetic alterations provide exquisite specificity as biomarkers and pinpoint targets for the development of therapeutics. Our group has focused on: a) applying genome-wide approaches, such as high-throughput, massively parallel sequencing, for the identification of genetic changes on specific genes involved in the development and progression of cancer; and b) using this knowledge for the development of clinically applicable methods for early diagnostics, companion diagnostics, monitoring of disease, and therapeutics for cancer.

Education
BS, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece

MS, University of Houston

PhD, University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston

Fogerty Fellowship, National Institutes on Aging, NIH

Postdoctoral Fellowship in Oncology, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine

Shibin
Zhou
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Hypoxia, a consequence of tumor cells outgrowing their blood supply, and subsequent angiogenesis are two of the hallmarks of rapidly growing solid tumors. My group has been exploiting these unique pathological features for developing novel therapeutic approaches. One example is the development of C. novyi-NT, an attenuated strain of the anaerobic bacterium Clostridium novyi. The hypoxic tumor compartment poses challenges for both chemo and radiation therapies as hypoxia diminishes the therapeutic effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiation. Conversely, this tumor compartment, hypoxic and immune-privileged, provides a unique niche for anaerobic bacteria to grow. We therefore generated C. novyi-NT, which has shown substantial therapeutic effects in experimental tumor models. A human Phase I trial and several canine trials are currently being conducted.

Education
PhD, University of Pittsburgh

MD, Beijing Second Medical University

Nishant
Agrawal
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Professor

Chetan
Bettegowda
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Professor

Lisa
Dobbyn
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Specialist

Margaret
Hoang
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow

Antonio
Kim
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

MD, PhD student

Zhao-Bo
Li
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Senior Research Specialist

Maria
Popoli
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Technologist

Yuan
Qiao
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Associate

Kathy
Romans
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Program Manager

Natalie
Silliman
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Research Technician II

Simeon
Springer
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

PhD student

Yuxuan
Wang
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

MD, PhD student

Latice
Watson
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Veterinary Technician

Jian
Yang
Johns Hopkins Center
Bio

Postdoctoral Fellow

RESEARCH AREAS

Identification of genes specifically mutated in human cancer (click to expand)

Research in the Ludwig Center at Johns Hopkins University is founded on the tenet that cancer is fundamentally due to a defect the cancer cell's genetic instructions. We have therefore focused our efforts on the identification of genes specifically mutated in human cancer. As a result of these efforts, we were the first group to sequence the exome in any human cancer, and eventually we would sequence 98 of the first 104 cancer exomes sequenced worldwide.

Our Center was paramount in defining many major cancer genes, including APC/β-catenin, FBXW, PIK3CA, IDH1/2, ARID1A/2, ATRX/DAXX and CIC/FUBP1. The identification of these mutated cancer genes provided important insights into the biology of cancer, suggested new therapeutic approaches and provided potentially clinically useful markers for cancer. This latter application is another major focus of our group.

Our Center was the first to demonstrate that the detection of mutated cancer genes in stool, plasma and other clinical samples could be used to monitor disease and detect human tumors at a stage when they were still curable. Our ultimate goal is that mutated cancer genes will be routinely used to detect cancer at early, curable stages. To help achieve this goal, we continue to develop innovative assays for detecting cancer gene mutations in clinical samples.

PUBLICATIONS

Diehl, F., Schmidt, K., Choti, M.A., Romans, K., Goodman, S., Li, M., Thornton, K., Agrawal, N., Sokoll, L., Szabo, S.A., Kinzler, K.W., Vogelstein, B. and Diaz Jr., L.A.  Circulating mutant DNA to assess tumor dynamics.  Nature Medicine 9: 985-990, 2008.

Parsons, D.W., Jones, S., Zhang, X., Lin, J.C., Leary, R.J., Angenendt, P., Mankoo, P., Carter, H., Siu, I.M., Gallia, G.L., Olivi, A., McLendon, R., Rasheed, B.A., Keir, S., Nikolskaya, T., Nikolsky, Y., Busam, D.A., Tekleab, H., Diaz, L.A. Jr, Hartigan, J., Smith, D.R., Strausberg, R.L., Marie, S.K., Shinjo, S.M., Yan, H., Riggins, G.J., Bigner, D.D., Karchin, R., Papadopoulos, N., Parmigiani, G., Vogelstein, B., Velculescu, V.E. and Kinzler K.W.  An Integrated Genomic Analysis of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme. Science 26: 1807-1812 2008.

Jones, S., Zhang, X., Parsons, D.W., Lin, J.C., Leary, R.J., Angenendt, P., Mankoo, P., Carter, H., Kamiyama, H., Jimeno, A., Hong, S.M., Fu, B., Lin, M.T., Calhoun, E.S., Kamiyama, M., Walter, K., Nikolskaya, T., Nikolsky, Y., Hartigan, J., Smith, D.R., Hidalgo, M., Leach, S.D., Klein, A.P., Jaffee, E.M., Goggins, M., Maitra, A., Iacobuzio-Donahue, C., Eshleman, J.R., Kern, S.E., Hruban, R.H., Karchin, R., Papadopoulos, N., Parmigiani, G., Vogelstein, B., Velculescu, V.E. and Kinzler, K.W.  Core Signaling Pathways in Human Pancreatic Cancers Revealed by Global Genomic Analyses. Science 321: 1801-1806, 2008.

Yun, J., Rago, C., Cheong, I., Pagliarini, R., Angenendt, P., Rajagopalan, H., Schmidt, K., Wilson, J.K.V., Markowitz, S., Zhou, S., Diaz Jr. L.A., Velculescu, V.E., Lengauer, C., Kinzler, K.W., Vogelstein, B., Papadopoulos, N.  Glucose Deprivation Contributes to the Development of KRAS Pathway Mutations in Tumor Cells. Science 325: 1555-1559, 2009.

He, Y., Wu, J., Dressman, D.C., Iacobuzio-Donahue, C., Markowitz, S.D., Velculescu, V.E., Diaz Jr., L.A., Kinzler, K.W., Vogelstein, B. and Papadopoulos, N. Heteroplasmic mitochondrial DNA mutations in normal and tumor cells. Nature 464:610-614, 2010. PMCID: PMC3176451

Jones, S., Wang, T.L., Shih,I.M., Mao, T.L., Nakayama, K., Roden, R., Glas, R., Slamon, D., Diaz, L.A. Jr., Vogelstein, B., Kinzler, K.W., Velculescu, V.E. and Papadopoulos, N.  Frequent Mutations of Chromatin Remodeling Gene ARID1A in Ovarian Clear Cell Carcinoma. Science 363: 1532-1543, 2010.

Jiao, Y., Shi, C., Edil, B.H., de Wilde, R.F., Klimstra, D.S., Maitra, A., Schulick, R.D., Tang, L.H., Wolfgang, C.L., Choti, M.A., Velculescu, V.E., Diaz, L.A. Jr., Vogelstein, B., Kinzler, K.W., Hruban, R.H. and Papadopoulos, N. DAXX/ATRX, MEN1, and mTOR Pathway Genes Are Frequently Altered in Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors. Science 331:1199-1203, 2011.

Bettegowda, C., Agrawal, N., Jiao, Y., Sausen, M., Wood, L.D., Hruban, R.H., Rodriguez, F.J., Cahill, D.P., McLendon, R., Riggins, G., Velculescu, V.E., Oba-Shinjo, S.M.,  Marie, S.K.N, Vogelstein, B.,  Bigner, D.,  Yan, H., Papadopoulos, N., Kinzler,  K.W. Mutations in CIC and FUBP1 contribute to human oligodendrogliomas. Science 333: 1453-1455, 2011.

Diaz, L.A. Jr., Williams, R.T., Wu., J., Kinde, I., Hecht, J.R., Berlin, J., Allen, B., Bozic, I., Reiter, J.G., Nowak, M.A., Kinzler, K.W., Oliner, K.S. and Vogelstein, B. The molecular evolution of acquired resistance to targeted EGFR blockade in colorectal cancers. Nature 486: 537-540, 2012.

Kinde, I., Bettegowda, C., Wang, Y., Wu, J., Agrawal, N., Shih, IeM., Kurman, R., Dao, F., Levine, D.A., Giuntoli, R., Roden, R., Eshleman, J.R., Carvalho, J.P., Marie, S.K., Papadopoulos, N., Kinzler, K.W., Vogelstein, B. and Diaz, L.A. Jr. Evaluation of DNA from the papanicolaou test detect ovarian and endometrial cancers.  Sci. Transl. Med. 5: 167ra4, 2013.