Success Stories

Making discoveries

Ludwig has a long history of pioneering cancer discoveries. Today, Ludwig scientists around the world are collaborating on new projects, and on ways to move breakthroughs toward the ultimate goal of patient benefit. These are some of the novel ways Ludwig researchers have teamed up to advance our understanding and control of cancer.

Judith Shizuru has long dreamt of using stem cells to perform—and transform—bone marrow transplantation. She recently took a big step toward that goal.

Ralph Weichselbaum’s decades-long quest to expand the uses of radiotherapy has exposed its ties to the immune response and yielded a trove of clues to novel cancer therapies.

Sangeeta Bhatia has harnessed an enduring fascination with getting synthetic things to infiltrate and talk to tissues to devise new approaches to diagnosing and treating cancer.

Paul Mischel’s long exploration of the cancer cell’s adaptability led him to one startling discovery about cancer genes and another about a brain tumor’s dependency on stolen cholesterol.

Partners in science Jedd Wolchok and Taha Merghoub solved a pharmacologic puzzle, to boost a cancer immunotherapy.

Richard Kolodner has made landmark discoveries on DNA repair and its link to cancer. Now he has unearthed a passel of genes that stabilize the genome, and are often defective in tumors.

George Coukos is all set to make Ludwig Lausanne a global pioneer in the development, delivery and evaluation of personalized, cell-based immunotherapies.

Joan Brugge talks about her research, the differences between academia and industry, science classes and communication, and swimming with whale sharks.

Karen Oegema of Ludwig San Diego talks about her scientific inspirations, the historical role of women in the field, and shares why science is a lot like playing in a jazz band or doing improvisational comedy.

Xin Lu talks about the one scientific discovery she would have liked to witness, whether women are gaining ground in science professions, and the similarities between art and science. Plus, the real world implications of her most significant research.

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